Tag Archives: jkd

My Continuing Journey as a Martial Artist

Since discovering Jeet Kune Do in 2010, I have come to appreciate Bruce Lee’s philosophy on fighting which is, simply put, get rid of any and all filler and develop a system which works best for you. One of the more fundamental aspects of JKD is, what appears to me, to be is its eclecticism in that it doesn’t hold strict to any rigid forms and is always evolving

That is why I have decided to leave the gym where I currently train, Kombat Arts Training Academy, and move myself to East-West Hapkido which is located in a more remote part of Toronto near the run-down area of Dupont and Dufferin. For those of you who aren’t familar with hapkido, it is an eclectic martial art which is closer to an extreme self-defense system than anything else as it is definitely not sport-friendly due to the techniques it employs.

Hapkido in action

For more information, I recommend reading the following (I don’t want to risk giving wrong information):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hapkido

http://www.worldhapkido.com/index.html

Vlog #1

Hey everyone, how’s it going? I would like to share with you my first ever video podcast which I put together just last week for my Social Media Tech and Design class. It’s about respect and discipline in the martial arts and it features me sparring with my JKD instructor and training partner, Martin at our gym, Kombat Arts Training Academy. Obviously it’s hard to capture the essence of what the martial arts are built on in a two-minute video so I do admit this is very much lacking in material but hopefully you get the gist of it anyway. Realistically though this topic could likely be turned into a full-length documentary. You’ll have to forgive the grainy video resolution. I filmed it with my iPhone.

I want to take a moment to thank:

  1. Kombat Arts Training Academy for their lovely facility where this was filmed
  2. Martin “Slam” Duncan for his time with me sparring
  3. Justin for filming the video
  4. EA and DICE for the Battlefield 3 theme which I do NOT own or hold the copyrights for but makes for a kickass theme

Enjoy!

Is MMA hurting martial arts in general?

MMA is becoming more and more popular every single day, as new jurisdictions legalise and sanction the sport all over North America and as the UFC continues to put on shows for its fans all over the world. Not a day goes by where something new is happening the world of mixed martial arts, whether it’s news of a rising star, a new #1 contender for a title, or another steroid allegation (or drug use, if your name is Nick Diaz).

In terms of MMA-geared martial arts, we most often hear about muay thai, boxing, freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling, and finally Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Once in a while there are fighters who break the mould like Lyoto Machida who is a Shotokan Karate black belt or Karo Paryisian who is a judo black belt. I’m not going to argue that the four martial arts mentioned above are no good because that’s far from the case. What I want to ask is whether or not the rise of MMA in society today has led to a “doing away with” of more traditional martial arts such as Japanese jiu-jitsu, aikido, hapkido, and even the aforementioned karate and judo as examples.

Whenever I step into my own local MMA gym and I train, I don’t often train in muay thai or boxing for the simple reason that I find them boring. I do enjoy freestyle wrestling as well as no-gi Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu because they’re excellent for cardio work, but at the end of the day, I find these martial arts to be overrated.

Please note, I’m not saying these systems are bad. But I believe that because MMA has become so popular, people talk about those systems (muay thai and BJJ in particular) as if they are the be-all, end-all, supreme martial arts that define the concept of martial arts itself. The martial arts are so varied and complex that there is no one supreme form out there. All of them work in different ways and the best option for anyone who claims to be a martial artist is to explore as many arts as they can and develop a system that works best for them.

I feel MMA’s popularity has discouraged the practice of developing one’s own system and path. It’s important to stay open to new forms of training and always explore new ways of fighting. Don’t get stuck with what is considered popular and exciting because it could hinder your growth as a martial artist.